New learning primarily challenges those that teach today.

As the OECD Pisa-Study 2018 concludes, students are only as good as their teachers. And in this case, what applies to teaching students can also be transferred to HR Learning & Development.

Internal qualification experts such as trainers and HR developers are a decisive target group. As multipliers they are effectively building the skills of staff while acting as guides for current changes.

Our case illustrates how to transform a conventional train-the-trainer programme into a modern, forward-looking qualification approach.

Neue New Teachers, New Learning
Formats

A premium automotive manufacturer finds itself confronted with various L&OD challenges. There is, for example, the central requirement to quickly prepare the workforce for the digital future.

Internal trainers and HR developers are experienced and well trained, but most of them still use the same methods as 20 years ago. They, themselves, have a considerable need for development when it comes to new learning.

At the same time, the outlined change creates an increasing learning pressure, requiring the timely implementation of new teachers and qualification format.

Obviously, the manufacturer is not alone in this challenge. Well-qualified trainers with experience in “future learning” are a rare find on the current market. Those that are newly recruited for this role therefore demonstrate a broad range of different skills and show a wide variety of development needs.

How “teaching” has been taught so far

Our client’s previous Train-the-Trainer programme was designed as a classic “one-size-fits-all” curriculum. Developed many years ago, it comprised several classroom modules and accompanying self-learning units in PDF format. The programme is representative for a traditional understanding of “blended learning” containing all things relevant for the qualification of this target group: brand, company, role, methodology, didactics and application.

Over the time, the programme had grown to twelve (12!) classroom days and has always been identical for each participant.

From curriculum to adaptive concept, from teacher to learning guide

The architecture for this contemporary “Train-the-Trainer” programme was influenced by two central considerations: How does a qualification concept for the future look which meets the above challenges and requirements in equal measure? And how is the role of the learning guide of the future defined?

It quickly became clear that a new version of the programme needed to be designed to adapt to individual qualification needs while considering a variety of prerequisites. It was therefore built as an adaptive qualification concept that can map individual learning paths. Content is segmented in micro-teaching units and can be accessed individually.

Of course, new learning is at the centre of meeting future qualification needs. Virtual learning modules, community learning, workspace learning and virtual learning support make up the majority of the programme. Where live training adds the highest value, classroom modules are complementing the course. Here, too, new designs and methods are used to strengthen learner’s self-efficacy.

We could also say: New Learning is learned through New Learning – by the new “trainer”. In the future, this trainer will be more of a learning companion who supports individual learning at the workplace and assists the learner in shaping his or her own learning path. This is fostered by feedback and by purposeful questions, or by individually arranged exercises.

In this way, learners develop into learning designers and co-moderators of their own qualification – and, thus, from trainer to enabler.

Qualification in tomorrow’s zeitgeist

The conception and coordination phase took place in several iteration loops with the customer and began with facing several pending decisions: Which competence model will be used and how will it be operationalized? Which resources are used to make implementation as lean as possible?

The overall concept follows the competence model of ability (transfer into application or action), knowledge and attitude (motivation/ mindset) and provides learning nuggets for the development of all competences. First, the learner explores his own learning fields in a development centre to then design his individual learner journey based on this experience.

Following the 70-20-10 approach of “Future Learning”, live workshops and small modularized knowledge bits are available virtually and on the job. Mandatory modules are combined with “on demand” offers. Throughout the programme, learners take part in community learning. Regular blogs and small tasks promote learning and exchange in different group sizes and compositions. They ensure learning transfer and enable the mutual exchange of experiences and support.

Specific skills, such as methodology and didactics, are taught in accompanying virtual classroom training sessions. With a learning guide as a sparring partner, the learner carries out an individual project enabling him to apply and test what he learned.

The good old “certification” at the end of the programme is a classroom event. It is somehow the tribute that is still “paid” to the old world. But that also makes sense – and certainly makes you proud. The event is combined with a future workshop and marks the final shift to new learning.

Because here, we are also talking about a change in learning culture …

Learners start with a virtual information phase before the actual start of the programme. This creates transparency in communication and an understanding of the new learning process. The participants get to know Community Learning right from the start.

This is the current status quo of the programme.

The first virtual tasks of the now following pre-phase make learners more familiar with this new learning format and prepare them for the live kick-off event.

Parallel to the information phase, details are currently being sketched out. Here, too, there is close coordination and iteration with the customer. So the journey has just begun.

Quite exciting.
Our customer is shaping the future – and we’re the right partner.

Leadership suffering? A recent coaching case with an experienced executive motivated us to present this case. Suffering is a term that has been coined by this coachee. The more intensively he got into working with himself, the more this topic gained in depth. For him. And probably not only for him.

How contemporary is “suffering”?

Suffering and leadership – is it at all opportune to use such a term today? A double yes is the answer.
On the one hand, it speaks for the fact that Goethe already showed us in “The Sorrows of Young Werther”, that the one who loves, suffers in the end. To associate leadership with love is a beautiful and thoroughly contemporary thought.
On the other hand, after many years under the primacy of “positive thinking” and the consequent reinterpretation of every attitude and statement into a “respectful formulation”, we are slowly allowing ourselves to name limiting thoughts and feelings again. This can be interpreted as a contribution to authenticity and to being human. And then there is a place for suffering. Above all, for those who come from a socialization where tolerating, accepting and bearing were still among the common virtues. And there are of course quite a few of them.

Managers are human

How could it happen that the coachee, trained at the best leadership schools in the world according to the latest leadership theories, came into contact with his own suffering? He probably does not belong to the category of ignorant managers, who are only able to see themselves, immune to change and not interested in their environment at all. It’s rather the opposite, he loves his job, taking people along, inspiring and at the same challenging and encouraging them.

Suffering slowly crept in over the years. At first rather unnoticed, which was also owed to the ideas of “positive thinking”. Then repressed and negated, probably due to personal socialization. At some point, sadness could no longer be repressed because one’s own values and self-efficacy were no longer sufficiently expressed. And the rage about how he was trapped in a role, again and again trying to adapt in all possible directions.

The employee satisfaction survey came along, where several requirement hat to be satisfied. Therefore, it was always better to be friendly, to never criticize or demand too much of anyone. It is best to practice indifference and distance. On the other hand, there was the pressure in terms of the numbers that had to be proven. If necessary, why not invest yet another night shift. Not to forget the employees, who felt that they received too little attention, but were increasingly quick to express their frustration loudly and quite often without the self-imposed appreciation. Personal needs were overlooked and had to be held back – social contacts, culture or simply fun in life became increasingly rare. Just ticking things of, ticking, ticking, ticking. And at some point, it didn’t work any longer, even with the negation, and he became aware of his “suffering”.

Is suffering really necessary?

It was obvious to take up this question in a suitable coaching context. And that like a sting into a wasp’s nest. No, of course not, the mind will say. Yes, the heart will respond, of course. It’s all about something. About one’s own values. Reliability, responsibility, love for the tasks and the people around him. Caring about the success of the company, the team and the individual. Self-efficacy and pride.
The basic assumption: Perseverance, tolerance and acceptance are the toll. The belief: If I only exert myself enough, I can manage it in the end. With the two of them pretty much inevitably leading to “suffering”. The head understood that, too.

From suffering to meaning

The recognition of what had worked so far over all the years while deforming the personality without even being perceived was a like a (healing) shock. And the trigger for one’s own transformation. At the beginning, there was the confrontation with the “suffering of leadership”, its roots and reasons in the here and now. At this point, the coachee found the methods of mindfulness and focused attention particularly helpful. Through this way he was able to find a better access towards himself again. Some everyday situations were reassessed and will certainly be dealt with differently in the future.

However, the found working on his own purpose to be particularly effective. He focused on his individual WHY (Simon Sinek) within his role. He named the meaning of his actions for the first time and subsequently redefined leadership for himself. For himself and in his team, he now relies heavily on self-management. He consistently hands over responsibility to his team. One example that has helped him a lot was working with the “Delegations Poker” of Management 3.0. The exciting effect is that he now has noticeably more time for himself, and without any additional effort of his own a significantly higher satisfaction among the people in his team.

In any case, the suffering has found an end and is now replaced by what one calls the “Purpose of Leadership”.

During our own Company Future Journey, we have received valuable gifts from our customers. They let us know openly and willingly what really matters to them when it comes to an effective cooperation with a service provider. We are very grateful for this and have learned a lot during this process. We are happy to share these experiences with you here. Especially since we are convinced that they can be multiplied infinitely.

The Journey towards Understanding

In the course of our own realignment, we also set out to fully understand our (potential) customers. To do so, we spent dedicated time in an observer position, taking a metaphorical perspective. What moves our customers, how do they act, what is important to them – and what is not. What might they value and what makes them feel disturbed? Next, we formed hypotheses and verified each of them in discussions with a sample consisting of both, our customers as well as potential interested parties. This was an educational process. Some hypotheses turned out to be correct, while others were just over the top. And some other perspectives we had not even grasped yet. We therefore describe our impressions as a valuable gift from our customers.

The Canvas of Significant Insights

The results of our observations and survey – the described valuable gifts – were depicted on a TCJG Customer Value Proposition Canvas. All findings were first sorted according to “tasks” (customer jobs), “needs” (gains) and “pain” (pains). This process step was extremely clarifying, because it triggered a change of perspective. Above all, an overview over “pain” ensured that ideas for customer-specific solutions could emerge.

Today, valuable gifts from our customers such as these are the foundation for the design of all our services. We verify every idea to see whether it is in line with our clients’ perspective. And we always first focus on the benefits, which our work brings to our customers. And which set us apart from other providers in the long term. This is what we understand by customer centricity.

At our customers I am currently observing an ardent desire towards more customer-centric service processes. Primarily, this transformation aims to increase external brand loyalty. For me, this demand is created by the feeling of uncertainty when being exposed to and forced to deal with rapid changes and developments of the future. If no one can tell how industries such as the automotive, finance or retail sector are going to change, then an individual and strong brand loyalty reduces the risk of losing customers immediately to the most innovative competitors. One of our customers, an international automotive manufacturer of exclusive sports cars, approached us at the beginning of the year, asking if we could develop an innovative management workshop for them. This workshop was supposed to sensitize senior managers for the needs of their customers and to enable them to implement customer-centric processes at their dealership. During the initial needs analysis, we realised quickly that rather a holistic approach is needed to comply with the given strategic goals. From our perspective, it was not only about a one-shot workshop but rather about enabling the dealer staff itself, to question existing processes on one’s own responsibility and subsequently align them with the needs of the customer. From our experience, it would be ideal if ideas for more customer-centric processes are not only developed by individuals with direct customer contact but, moreover, customers get the chance to give feedback on the ideas as well. In addition, the concept we developed should also be applicable to other topics. Therefore, we developed, in collaboration with the customer, a holistic concept of several, consecutive (mini) workshops, that contained valuable components from Design Thinking: a fixed number of employees volunteer to participate at the initial workshop and every participant chooses a tandem partner from the organisation to go jointly on a customer journey. For this journey, the participants receive typical personas with characteristics derived from the customer base. From the viewpoint of these personas, the participants explore the online and offline brand representation of several exclusive brands and own competitors. The findings are brought into the next workshop and based on positive and negative experiences, ideas for implementation at the dealer evolve. In a next step, these ideas are presented to the whole dealer staff and refined by all employees in creative sessions. Shortly after, the best ideas are presented to selected customers to test them on attractiveness, usability and customer orientation. Finally, iterated selected ideas are implemented at the dealership. Unlike familiar process and KPI-oriented measures, this approach was completely new to the organisation and revealed the main challenge: All workshops are not designed to reach a defined goal, but the outcome of the workshop is totally dependent on the intrinsic commitment of the participants. This requires a precise facilitation of the process and all participants need to be constantly motivated to push their own creativity. For pilot testing, we accompanied our client to two European markets to support local adaption of the concept without losing the focus on a consecutive process. We also conducted a Train-the-Facilitator event for market key account manager to impart a new understanding of roles. Moving from a process consultant towards a facilitator who steers a process that enables the participants to question existing processes and align them with the needs of the customer. Changes in the future do not only apply to organisations but are even more relevant on an individual level. We are best prepared to handle upcoming changes by focusing on distinct self-responsibility and self-guidance. Individually and within our organisations. A contribution from:

Andreas Grotekemper Senior Consultant of TCJG

As a conceptionist here at TCJG the first project I accompanied had nothing to do with the innovative qualification programmes which I got to know in the past. That’s very impressive and it certainly confused me in the first place.

Due to my studies of media- and educational management and my former job as e-learning responsible at a manufacturer of machines and components I got to know the educational design of Blended Learning 2.0. I am used to editing content and enhancing it with a variety of media on a certain learning chain.

But in my first project at TCJG, I was inspired by a new approach. An exciting combination of Learning Journeys based on topic related learning chains with the option to match various modules that meet the individual learner’s needs. By this approach, the Learning Journey becomes a highly individual Learner’s Journey. The greatest advantage is that everyone learns exactly what he needs and, furthermore, he is tempted to discover additional content to qualify even more. That’s great.

The binding element is the eCoach. His task is to individually accompany and guide the learner and to ensure that he exchanges his thoughts with peers, engages in collaboration and personal development. His touchpoints with the learner are mostly virtual ones. Besides that, also meetings in person are planned in the occasion of a needs assessment, instructor-led workshops and coaching sessions.

My conceptional output for this project is to create an instructional guideline for such a learning companion. For this, roles and competencies of the eCoach are precisely described. Furthermore, we document as a team detailed coaching sessions and designs for (virtual) coaching sessions that aim to build up about 50 competencies.

A major project, which is real fun to work with.

 

A contribution by Hanna Korn:

Conceptionist and New Learning Media Specialist at TCJG

Conceptionists Profile as PDF

It’s amazing how the Internet of Things is capturing our daily lives more and more. Have you noticed that over the last several years every generation, from primary schoolchildren to retirees, can be observed with their digital companions? I also often catch myself looking at my iPhone to pass the boredom by.

How exciting is it, that the technical developments through the autonomous driving will soon allow us to give up this temptation while driving? Over the last few years, automobile manufacturers have come up with more and more features to better connect vehicles with the digital world. It can be assumed that these “connect” services won’t be used intuitively by every generation, and can be a challenge for some users.

An international, 20-person-strong call center team, is to cover the future support needs of these “connect” services for one of our premium automotive customers. A unique challenge: the team was set up by a supplier and, therefore, served two groups. On one side, the actual employer and, on the other side, the automobile manufacturer, whose brand they should represent to the outside customers. Thus, in a kick-off workshop, it was necessary to communicate not only basic knowledge about the history, strategy and portfolio of the automotive manufacturer, but, most importantly, to create an identification with the brand. The brand values need to be represented by the employee to the customer constantly.

Therefore, it was necessary to develop a suitable concept to inspire the team to connect to the brand. In the development and implementation of this four-day kick-off workshop, I was able to combine many components of my previous professional background: several years of experience in the consultant sector in project and change management, experience as a trainer and facilitator in international projects, as well as, the personal development of people. To see others grow, feel their joy and motivation after a training session, and experience how they want to tackle things, is certainly one of the most rewarding moments in my job.

So how do you unleash the joy of a brand and motivate employees to live up to the brand values in the workplace? Well, I admit, this time it wasn’t very difficult. How could one experience driving a fast sports car on a race track and not be enthusiastic about the brand? Despite all this, we also had to create a transfer, from the exciting experiences with the products to the transition of the brand characteristics to the daily work life of supporting the customer.

The participants were divided into the different brand values and discussed their ideas on how to translate “innovation,” “exclusivity” and other values to personal attitudes, as well as, specific actions. The results yielded astonishing insights into simple ways in which the concept of service can be delivered specifically for this brand.

Therefore, the challenge was successful. My goal was achieved when, after creating the concept and implementing it with the customer, the participants carry out their enthusiasm about the brand in their daily contact with the customer.

I’m also pleased to continue to be involved in the field of classical consulting for implementing international projects, as well as, for personnel diagnostics. Frequently, our clients’ needs require a combination of these different priorities. A guarantee that this job is certainly one thing: never boring.

 

A contribution from:
Andreas Grotekemper
Senior Consultant der TCJG

Consultant Profile Andreas Grotekemper

Blended Learning

Individuality, practical relevance, meaning – these values are often associated with the generation Y. These values are important to me – not only because I am part of this generation, but also with regard to learning strategies: I do not want to follow a strict “master plan” because it can never suit everybody – individual learning is the answer, mobile based, in small units, in exchange with colleagues and coaches, exactly when I need it.

That’s why I am a passionate advocate of the blended learning approach: Start a learning path at work on the laptop, edit the next learning nugget on my iPad at home on the couch, listen to a podcast on my iPhone during my ride back to work in the underground and afterwards quickly answer a single choice question. Within the community and during live workshops I am looking forward to exchange experiences with colleagues and coaches. I discuss best practices with colleagues and my coach gives me feedback on my performance and on my learning progress. Learning – exactly as it fits into my life.

During the 3 years of working for a language learning provider as a project manager and instructional designer, I have experienced the requirement for individualized learning methods: the need for application-oriented learning tools (Why am I doing this? In how far does that help me?) is as present as the requirement for mobile solutions (Is this exercise optimized for my iPad? Can I practice on my smartphone? Will my learning progress be synchronized across devices?). Students who exclusively learn digitally for themselves often confirm not having passed a low level of competence. I also noticed for myself: I appreciate to pursue my personalized learning path – but I am unable to go ahead without exchanging ideas within my group and getting support from my coach.

For the development of blended learning concepts, it is important that all stakeholders are involved from the beginning: not the teacher who claims for himself to know better, but the learner is in focus. With the learning path being designed dedicated to the learner’s needs and with the system being extensible, the learner is able to learn based on individual likes. The system provides continual development and includes relevant and current content.

It was very exciting to participate in TCJG’s development of this blended learning concept:
As part of the project team I created a competency-based curriculum with methodical and didactic recommendations for an international leadership development program. Hereby the following questions were elicited: What does the learner need to accomplish the goals? How to structure the learning content to fit into the (working) day? How to consider different knowledge levels and priorities? The comprehensive answer is a modular design, consisting of small, varied learning units, which together result in a useful learning path. My didactical background and my practical experiences on development of educational content and environments helped me to consider a sensible combination of joint attendance phases and digital self-learning units.

The learning paths are based on a qualification matrix, which was concluded and developed from a project team based on the employees’ competence profiles. Further exciting processes were the analysis of needs in advance, which for example included Interviews with all stakeholders, the development of a credit point system and the field test with all participants who tested the concept in an interactive workshop. High value was put on the continuous development of the project and the consideration of feedback and learnings. The benefit of an iterative approach with regular testing phases is to develop in respect of the learner’s needs and not to miss the learner’s goals. That is my role as a conceptionist at TCJG.

A blog from one of our Guides

That change has to happen in order to ensure global competitiveness and sustainable success of companies is common sense. “Change” and “Change Management” are of every day concern for business practitioners. And still, we are afraid of change, we face it with reluctance. It is just so difficult to move away from the way “it’s always been“.

Although I would consider myself a relatively open-minded person, who many times has actively looked for a change – despite a University degree in economics and law, I decided to seek experience outside my subject area in development cooperation and later worked on communications and training at the United Nations, which led me towards dedicating my competency and experience to a business-consultancy today – I quite often found myself in situations where change scared me or evoked an act of defiance. Looking back these reactions were mostly caused by change I could not influence or did not understand.

Employees that face “Organizational Change“ often react in a similar way. They feel helpless and lack comprehension regarding the necessity for upcoming change. When asked, concerned employees often name miscommunication as a reason for their behaviour.

Thus, I am currently very excited to develop and implement the strategy for the internal communication that accompanies a major global change process at a German premium automobile manufacturer. Overall objective of this strategy is the dissemination of information that emphasizes the benefits of change and the advantages a global Leadership Development Programme has for everyone. The added value of the programme for each person as an individual has to be the key element of all communication.

From the very start the project team has to create a “sense of urgency“ when communicating to stakeholders. Crucial for clear and efficient communication throughout the project is selecting the right means of communication and communication dates compliant with target groups and content. Regular communication (we currently use a monthly blog) is thereby as important as information on the achievement of important milestones in the project implementation. The diversified communication portfolio contains platforms for peer-learning and online-chats as well as face-to-face events that make personal exchange a unique and memorable experience.

To avoid the impression that senior management has yet again come up with a new idea, communication both ways is essential. True communication is conversation, not the presentation and information about a new concept. In the current project, the “conversation” is mostly taking place in so-called “online-communities“. These are internal corporate social networks, which foster exchange between the project team and employees as well as among employees. Traditional hierarchies are broken, corporate identity is strengthened and through their contributions every employee becomes a change-enabler.

Innovative media, like videos and podcasts that help transmit key messages and additional information on a certain subject matter can be exchanged via community. This is essential when it comes to raising and sustaining continued interest in the new programme.

After all “change“ also means to change internal communication and to adapt communication to the change. I like to contribute to this process, as a consultant, blogger and facilitator!

A contribution by one of our guides

In the future, the transfer of management responsibility will be an important issue for many companies. Annually 27.000 enterprises are looking for successors. I have already guided and implemented this process within my own family business. Meanwhile, finding suitable candidates increasingly becomes difficult regarding the ongoing demographic change and lack of specialists. For this reasons it is highly necessary to sensitize companies, on an executive level, in terms of succession arrangements. From my point of view, handing over a business means simply more than an advanced heritage.

Based on my own experience, I really like to take the task of guiding and leading business handovers successfully. As I took over my parents’ business and was working for a leading German car manufacturer myself, the challenges people and organizations face are quite familiar to me. Today, I guide people following the same path by supporting them as a passionate consultant.

The “company succession programme” I currently conceptualized is based on various modules which involve and challenge the senior heads of business as much as their successors. The programme starts with a day of coaching at the company facilities. During this outset all concerned parties are encouraged to discuss the particular situation of succession and to reconcile the process of the business transfer. At this stage we also assess the successor’s potential and elaborate his or her customized development plan. The programme then includes skill-based training modules, practical experience and exercise, as well as individual coaching sessions over a period of 24 months. This tailor made approach ensures that all competencies necessary for successful entrepreneurship are developed. Moreover, the holistic concept guarantees a sustainable business strategy that is supported by all concerned parties and stakeholders. The “company succession programme” is concluded with the certification of the company successor.

Thinking about a successor, becoming aware of his own responsibilities, creative possibilities and the courage to face all future business challenges, makes me proud to be a part of this programme.

 

A contribution by:
Rainer Schulz
Consultant at TCJG

Consultant Profile as PDF

Every organization has to rely on competent, motivated, and disciplinary executives. Identifying high potential employees to qualify them specifically and grow their loyalty to the company is a great way to secure future leaders.

Our current project “Talent Development” is built on this premises and involves the identification and development of high potentials of an importer of motor vehicles in Germany.

Potential candidates are determined by a panel of experts then undergo a development assessment with a systematic personnel diagnostics method.

Due to my background in Psychology, I thoroughly enjoy the development of an appropriate competency model and the selection of meaningful exercises for this orientation workshop. It was important to me to address the specific needs of the business accurately. The exercises I designed ensure that the participants work on issues that have a direct bearing on the company and their daily work.

The systematic diagnostic process provides a personal position determination for the high potentials. This provides the basis on which we express a clear recommendation for personal development paths and derive differentiated offers for the further development of the participants.

The performance results, the individual competencies and the development recommendations are documented in reports that are the basis for development plan meetings between HR, the executives and high-potential employees and then serve as a guide for the design of a customized training program. Therefore, creating these reports is a valuable and meaningful task. Fortunately it resides in the cross-section of what I am good at and thoroughly enjoy.

 

A contribution by:

Kristina Reßler

Project Manager / Conceptionist at TCJG

Guide Profile Kristina Ressler

In October 2015 we produced a film to function as part of a client’s training workshop. I was given the opportunity to support the project for TCJG due to my long-term experience in this field. Personal statements of the protagonists in combination with matching stock material gave the participants both emotional and logical access to the training topic. In tandem with themain project manager, I supervised the project from conception to the final delivery and thoroughly enjoyed to be fully in my element again.

Producing a film as part of a training workshop or course can be quite challenging and easily underestimated. Especially when there is a sporty time and economic budget involved.

The main foundation for success is of course, a high quality film production. The learning concept and content has to be precisely integrated into the final film. Quite often, the key element for success lies in the cooperation between the film production company and the client’s agency conception team. At this point all too often worlds collide. In this specific case my film industry experience came in very handy. The job is a lot easier when you speak the same language: from cameraman to cameraman.

At first a script was developed in coordination with the film production, based on our concept. During the production I took over the directing part regarding the contextual implementation of the script. Throughout the film production I established a personal connection between the production company and the conception. An activity that combines everything that drives me forward with energy and passion: creativity, communication and conception.

A wonderful addition to my daily work as a project manager at TCJG.

 

A contribution by:
Max Laufer
Project Manager at TCJG

Consultant Profile as PDF

This project deals with one of my favorite topics. During my previous employment in the 5* hotel field I was particularly passionate about anticipating guests needs and creating special surprise moments that truly elevated their stay. I was always ready to give my best to create extraordinary experiences for our guests and customers.

And this is the topic I am currently occupied with. We are developing a global qualification program, which empowers service advisors to anticipate needs and concerns in order to proactively provide unconsciously demanded services to customers. In the current (first) phase of the project, I am dealing with the project organization, clarifcation talks and interviews with the client and other stakeholders and the creation of the overall architecture of the concept. The learning objectives I have now developed serve as basis for the selection of methods and media for the final program design.

Therefore, I have already begun making the first arrangements with other partners, for example, audio media production companies. It is currently necessary to determine how to optimally combine virtual and live training moduals. This is a creative phase in which it is necessary to keep a cool head, manage complexity and mentally always be a step ahead.

That suits me.

A contribution by:
Viktoria von Samson-Himmelstjerna
Consultant at TCJG

Consultant profile as PDF