Tag Archive for: workshop

Concepta…what? You’ve probably never heard of a conceptathon. This brand new future format of New Learning comes directly from the TCJG forge and is full of teamwork, collaboration and visible end results.

This workshop design has its roots in the agile world and follows the approach: learning by doing. Within three days, concepts for pre-defined cases are developed in small groups – intensively and innovatively. Alternating between short inputs, units, and workflows according to the sprint logic and pitches of the interim results. Everyone can play to their strengths and push themselves out of their comfort zone. Everything for the grand finale, the final pitch and the opportunity to learn how to deliver quality conception work quickly.

We were able to prove in our pilot that this does not only mean spinning heads and hard work, but is also really fun!

10 people worked for three days on three different concept challenges and the results were overwhelming: multi-media, complex, agile and with a lot of heart and soul.

We’ll take you on a little Conceptathon journey and sum up at the end.

And if you want to learn more about the future format beforehand: You can find our blog here.

At the Conceptathon, we didn’t hesitate for long. We took enough time to arrive, meet the group and define our expectations and goals (TCJG top tip here: Expectations and goals are perfect as a task in the run-up; the group already deals with the topic of conception and the anticipation of the workshop rises), but we also quickly got to the part that everyone was looking forward to: the presentation of the cases and thus the kick-off of the Conceptathon.

In the case groups, they first familiarised themselves with their own task, did research (also with the clients as interview partners), then, after inspiring input on the topic of goal definition, formulated it (a step that many have always liked to skip in the past) and bundled and expanded the collected findings in a rough concept.

Aha results guaranteed

This is where the first aha experiences took place: The change of perspective presented the first challenge to one or the other. To empathise with the client(s), to ask the right questions and to explore the case without immediately finding a solution was a task that our participants sometimes had to work hard at. Their heads were already bubbling over with creativity and ideas – then taking a step back and looking at the requirements can be frustrating, but it is necessary.

The results then spoke for themselves: our groups were able to get to the heart of their cases and prepare their rough concepts in such a way that creativity could be given free rein on day 2 – without having to deal with legacy issues from the previous conceptual step.

And there was something else we learned: The templates and small aids we prepared for our participants served us well during the event. They provide orientation and give the group the chance to concentrate on the essentials: Conception.

Even after the event, the team spirit continued to be fuelled: over pizza and vino, we laughed, exchanged ideas and recharged our batteries for the next day!

Day 2 – Conceptathon – the creative minds are activated

The group started day 2 highly motivated, and things got off to a dynamic start, because we wanted to fill our concepts with life.

But first the theory: together we worked out which methods, formats and media we could best use at which point in our learning structure. What achieves the greatest effects? What helps us reach our goals best? What out-of-the-box possibilities have we not yet considered?

This got the creative heads activated and prepared them well for the rest of the day. It was precisely these results that could be used for the further development of the cases. The participants were able to be creative in their fine structure, use funky formats and work out architectures with great attention to detail.

Intensive work units with clear objectives, feedback sessions and slack time alternated again and again. We were amazed at how many ideas we could spin together in such a short time and, thanks to the previously prepared structure, steer them in a productive direction.

In the evening, the creative work continued: even the rain couldn’t stop us from having a BBQ. So the grill master got a roof over his head and the group set up the buffet indoors. With homemade salads from the team and conversations about things that are currently on our minds, it tasted even better.

Day 3 – Conceptathon – The Grand Finale

The grand finale – but by no means was the air out!

On the last day of the Conceptathon, our participants really stepped on the gas, put the finishing touches on their concept and produced material.

The final pitches and presentations of the concept consequently had it all: from 360° videos to trainer guides for workshops and passionate explanations, everything was there, and our participants set off a real concept firework!

Of course, it was difficult to decide on the best concept, which is why we quickly declared everyone a winning team and celebrated our new team spirit together with a visit to the wine bar!

Our event was rounded off with an intensive reflection on the last few days. What did the participants take away? What will they do differently now? Were they able to achieve their goals from the beginning of the event?

One sentence in particular stuck in our minds: “Now I finally know what should really matter in my job!”, one of our participants openly shared with us, thus giving us high praise.

We said goodbye as a team, as conceptathonists and with a lot of motivation for our next concept work!

Our conclusion: A future format that makes fun!

Our conclusion for the Conceptathon is entirely positive: It really is a future format that is fun!

With a lot of creativity, collaboration and dynamism, it helps teams to set a focus and get down to work in a short time. A conceptathon is suitable for a wide range of topics, strengthens individual competences and produces immediately visible results: finished concepts.

Our Conceptathon already had kids. See here the Main-Donau-Isar Projekt.

 

Would a Conceptathon be something for you and your team? You want to see visible results quickly and take your conceptual work to the next level? Then get in touch with us and we’ll realise your New Work Booster together!

 

Written by: Victoria Durner

Sie gestalten Zukunft.
Mit uns geht das gut!

 

12.01.2021

In today’s world, B2C business is confronted with enormously high expectations from its customers. These expectations must be met throughout the entire customer journey, especially in stationary retail. This raises the question of where added value can be created when the well-informed customer already knows everything. One possible answer is to open up an experience space and present yourself as a host. A host for customers.

Mindset Change in stationary retail

A lot has happened in recent years since omnichannel has taken hold. Today, it is a matter of course that customers are provided with full 24-hour support via a wide range of virtual and live channels. Services such as 24-hour shopping, chatbots, personal round-the-clock telephone support, and even parcel couriers who contact customers when no one is at home or collect the unwanted product, are currently standard.

These experiences determine the demands of today’s customers in their purchasing behavior. This has a significant impact on retailers and their employees. The times when a “Can I help you?” or a “If I can help with anything, just get in touch” were enough are over. Now it’s about picking up the customer where he or she stands and creating an experience. Make the customer feel welcome and in good hands. Being a host for customers.

This calls for a mindset change among people in stationary retail.
But what does that actually mean: being a host for customers?

From concierge to host for customers

From the hotel industry, the role of the concierge is well known. A concierge fulfills the most individual wishes of his customers. He does not sell a product per se, but a feeling. The feeling of hospitality. In other words, he takes on the role of host and ensures that the customer feels at home from the very first second. The stationary retail for luxury and premium products has adopted this concept of the concierge. Today, employees are no longer just brand ambassadors, but also hosts who create experiences for customers.

This is a job enrichment and it requires the expansion of the skill set.

In this case, a multi-modular Learning Journey over a period of 3-4 months has proven its worth. TCJG has developed it on behalf of a client and has now conducted it several times. For hosts for customers.
Including the stages: Mindset, Skillset and Toolset. With virtual and face-to-face workshops, a learner community, self-learning and learning-on-the-job units and at the end a best-business-practise-sharing.

A journey of self-awareness towards becoming an individual host

Arrive, observe and understand

It starts with a webinar where all prospective hosts:in get to know each other and learn the itinerary. It is led by a host for customers. For his host-customers.

In the first phase, the participants make their own observations and collect stories with personal host experiences. In addition, self-learning material is available that provides orientation on concepts such as customer centricity or contact and relationship management or even the needs of customers today.
Sharing is caring, therefore they share their thoughts with the fellow participants in the community and reflect their impressions for the first time with a coach. The goal is to understand the customer, their own role or even expectations and possible appropriate behaviors.

Experience, discover and try out

Then the participants meet for a 1.5-day experience-oriented presence workshop. The goal of the live workshop is to develop a coherent understanding of the role of the host and to build competence in creating exceptional customer experiences.

The participants go through a variety of interactive exercises and reflections. For example, there is a rally with mini-sessions on skills and behavior in contact and communication situations. Or a course where, among other things, simulations take place with actors who slip into the role of customers and realistically re-enact various customer situations. The participants receive direct feedback from the actors on their behavior. The creative unit, in which host avatars are created by many hands and with heart, is particularly appreciated.

The highlight is certainly the experience of being received and cared for by hosts as a customer at a dinner. In the process, role models are reflected. Legendary are the hosts’ stories in an informal round, with which the evening ends.

Deepen, share and celebrate

After the workshop, it’s a matter of putting what you’ve learned into action. As a host, this means creating exceptional customer experiences in the workplace. The participants not only consolidate the skills they have acquired. They also act as role models and mentors for other colleagues in their own retail business over a period of around 6 weeks. They share their experiences with peers. Tips are welcome. In this way, they succeed in internalizing the attitude of the host, acquire special skills in communication and contact behavior with customers, and mature into hosts for customers.

At the end, the best business practices will be contested in a collegial competition. All participants pitch their best practices for a “Host for Customers” award. It is clear that there can only be winners. In any case, everyone celebrates the completion together.

 

What do you think, would the role of a host also be something for the people in your organization?

We look forward to exchanging ideas.

Please contact us.

This case was written by Katharina Popovits.